Jim Dine Biography

Jim Dine

Jim Dine

Jim Dine was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1935 and received a BFA from Ohio University, Athens, in 1957. He moved to New York City in 1958 and instantly became an active figure in the art world, first winning acclaim for his happenings and mixed-media assemblages. In 1962, his work was included — along with pieces by Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, Wayne Thiebaud and others — in the historically important and ground-breaking “New Painting of Common Objects,” curated by Walter Hopps at the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, California. This exhibit is considered one of the first Pop Art shows in America. Since that time, Dine’s paintings, sculptures, photography, and prints have been the subject of some 300 solo exhibitions worldwide.

With all his artistic accomplishments, Dine has always considered his printmaking efforts important in and of themselves. He’s been quoted as saying: “I love to make prints. I have made them all my life. I like the medium. It’s not that I necessarily want a more democratic art for all people, it’s just that I like printmaking. Making prints is as important to me now as making drawings or paintings.” (Quoted in an essay by Joseph Ruzicka in “Jim Dine Prints, 1985-2000: A Catalogue Raisonné”) His signature motifs include hearts, the Venus de Milo, robes, trees, hands, flowers, skulls, ravens, owls, and Pinocchio.

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